Seven Questions to Ask When Buying a Used Car

Everyone loves the new car smell, but is it worth paying thousands for? Buying a used car as an alternative of buying a new car can be a smart move, saving you as much as 30 percent off the sticker price. But once you have decided to forgo the odor of fresh carpet, paint and engine oil, you have to make sure nothing smells fishy about the used car you are considering. Inquire these seven questions first, and then purchase a can of new car scent online just for $13.99.

1. What is Vehicle Identification Number (VIN)?
With the help of car’s vehicle identification number, or VIN, you can order up a motor vehicle history report from several companies, including CARFAX.com. You can also find out if there is anything really rotten about the car: if the odometer has been rolled back, or if it has a “salvage title” as an end result of being reported as a total loss by an insurance company, for instance. The report will also show how many previous owners the car has had.

2. What is the maintenance history of your car?
Ask the current vehicle owner to show you records of oil changes, routine maintenance as well as the mechanical work that might reveal a whiff of a problem.

3. Why are you selling this motor vehicle?
Do not rely on the seller’s honesty but on your own instincts with this one. If the existing owner cannot give you a plausible explanation, that can be a indication that he may be trying to pass off a lemon. If you odor a rat, move on.

4. Is this car is still under warranty?
Just as when you are shopping for a fresh jug of milk, you’ll want to pick the car that has the most time left previous to the expiration date – on the warranty that is. If the warranty won’t transfer, or if it is previously expired, consider asking the seller to cut the price by what it would price to buy an extended warranty. Used cars After that you can decide whether to purchase the extended warranty or else bank the money for possible repairs.

5. Can I test drive this car?
Of course, it would show signs of a scam if the owner were at all reluctant to let you take it for a spin. Pay more attention on how the car performs on hills, highways also in stop-and-go traffic.

6. Can I take this car to a mechanic?
Usually for less than $100, you can easily get an expert to sniff out any less-than-obvious problems. Find a mechanic who is specialized in this kind of inspection by checking in the phone book below “automotive diagnostic service.”

7. What is your best price for this vehicle?
Once you have decided that the car passes the smell test, it is time to negotiate a deal. Perform your research first, and then be equipped to walk away if you know the seller’s lowest offer is excessively high.

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